UC Jazz Spring Concert at 7pm at Alumni House

UC Jazz Performers

UC Jazz will have its Spring Concert on Friday April 23 at 7 pm at the Alumni House and we will have an online auction April 20-30, 2010

We need your donations for this silent auction. Please donate products, art work, DVDs, CDs, trips, restaurant coupons, cars, designer outfits, accessories or certificate to your retail outlet or a specific product. Your contributions will be valued and we will promote them to our loyal audience of about 6 000 readers. Please contact Carol Suveda about your donation and provide Edie Okamoto at eokamoto@riovida.net with your product photo and a press release.

Additionally your donation is tax deductible. Your participation will assure that the UC Jazz Ensembles will continue to thrive. The UC Jazz Ensembles are a student run organization since the late sixties. Since it is a student run organization – meaning that it provides engineering, information systems students, any student that is NOT enrolled in the accredited music program a chance to enjoy music. Therefore, as UC Berkeley along with many other educational institutions is facing ever deeper budget cuts, the UC Jazz Ensembles program is particularly affected.

Please contact Student Activities Director, Carole Suveda, to arrange pickup of your donations at (510) 643-2662.

or I have enclosed or will deliver the donation to UC Jazz Ensembles to  72 Cesar Chavez Center # 4280 * Berkeley, CA  94720-4280 or FAX (510) 643-9463

o I would like UC Jazz to create a gift certificate describing my donation.

o I have enclosed a business card or brochure to give to the winning bidder.

o I would like my donation picked up.  Best time to call: ______________________P

The University of California is a non-profit organization; your donation is tax deductible. (Tax ID #94-6002123) 
Click for a copy of this form for your records.

Please reply by no later than April 5th. Your assistance and contribution is much appreciated.

TED MOORE WATCH

On March 12, Ted’s group, “Studio 104,” will perform in concert at the Jazz School in Berkeley. This concert will feature UC Jazz faculty members Dann Zinn and Frank Martin, as well as Kai Eckhardt (formerly with John McLaughlin) on bass

Frank Martin Watch

From intense high energy fusion to Indian influenced improvisations, from dense and heavy darkish atmospheres to lyrical moods, Claude Pauly’s new CD featuring bassist Kai Eckhardt (John McLaughlin, Garaj Mahal) , drummer Alan Hertz (Scott Henderson, Garaj Mahal) and keyboardist Frank Martin ( John McLaughlin, Richard Bona, Sting…) is a high density experience of the different landscapes of electric jazz fusion guitar playing and writing. But this isn’t just another guitar album. This CD is drenched in what it’s actually all about….music!. Fans of Allan Holdsworth, John McLaughlin, Scott Henderson, Greg Howe will absolutely dig this kick butt album . Much recommended.

Claude Pauly (guitars); Kai Eckhardt (bass); Alan Hertz (drums); Frank Martin (piano,keyboards). Download Sampler

Dann Zinn Watch

Dann Zinn will perform on Monday, Mar 8th, 2010 with Joe DeRose CD Release Party. Yoshi’s Oakland, 8PM

Born in San Jose, California, Joe has been playing the drums since the age of five. He was first taught at home by his older brother Gino. He later became active playing in school bands and is an alumni of the Alum Rock Jazz Band (88). At age 14, Joe began playing professionally around the San Francisco bay area. He has had the honor of studying with such greats as Louie Bellson, Joe Porcaro, Freddie Grubber, Wally Schnalle, Bryant Mills, Karl Carter, John Ramsay, Rick Considine, Lewis Nash, Kenwood Denard, Mike Mangini and many others. In 1994, Joe followed his dream and moved to Boston to attend the Berklee College of Music. The Berklee experience was everything Joe could have imagined. He graduated in 1998, with a Bachelors in Performance, Magna Cum Laude. While living in Boston, Joe toured with R&B, Blues diva, Toni Lynn Washington. Now that Joe has moved back to San Jose he has most recently finished two European tours with Hip-Hop artist, Kofy Brown, and a northern California tour with Italian tenor, Pasquale Esposito. He also is a member of corporate party band Groove Nugget, Jazz trio, Jazzfunkshun, and leads his own Jazz-Fusion based group, Joe De Rose and Amici. Joe also in November 2006 had the honor of performing his debut drum clinic for San Jose Pro Drum opening for drum legend, Tommy Aldridge. Joe freelances all over the bay area with styles ranging from Funk, Hip-Hop, Reggae, Fusion, Rock, Latin to Jazz. In October of 2008, Joe completed a Japanese tour with jazz vocalist, Yoshiko Oda and The Hristo Vitchev quartet. They performed all over Japan including the Okazaki Jazz Festival.

GLENN RICHMAN WATCH

Jazzschool faculty member Glenn Richman will be appearing at Yoshi’s SF with Cedar Walton, Slide Hampton, Jimmy Heath, Bobby Hutcherson and Eddie Marshall March 12-14, 2010.

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Artist Highlight – Frank Martin

“The joy and passion I get when I touch a piano from the instrument has never changed” Frank Martin

Frank Martin Producer/Arranger/Keyboardist
Frank Martin Producer/Arranger/Keyboardist

Frank Martin, a producer/arranger is a sought after piano and keyboards player who regularly performs with artists such as Sting, Stevie Wonder, Patti Austin, Narada Michael Walden, etc. Frank Martin made himself available for an interview for our UC Jazz Club Newsletter.

We asked him, what is the most wonderful thing about jazz for you? Frank Martin told us that it is a vehicle for communication with other people. It’s a way to connect, it is a higher-level-than words, powerful connection. I love the listening and the playing off of each other. Music is a great vehicle to communicate.

What originally inspired you to become a jazz musician? Frank told us that the evolution started out of the joy of making music. “I can remember when my piano first arrived in my home as gift to my sisters by my grandmother. I remember putting my hands on it and feeling a strong connection. It was so profound! I still feel this way today when I touch a piano. The joy and passion I get from the instrument has never changed. 

I started out as an improvising piano player. The joy I felt was in exploring the world of improvisation and that easily leads one to jazz. Jazz is all about improvisation. It was a natural progression into the jazz world.

I also had the good luck of finding pianist/organist Don Burke.
I grew up in Oakland and initially he was in Oakland and eventually he moved to San Leandro. He and Dave Brubeck studied with the same teacher. I often started my lessons with the music of Dave Brubeck. Don also had me play Miles Davis and Bill Evans. He would play this music and I started to learn and develop a love for that music. I have to give him the credit for planting the seeds.

My first public performance was at Disneyland when I was five years old. I was in Disneyland and by chance ran into another five year old friend of mine who was there as well. When they got the kids on stage, I jumped up with my friend Mike McGuire and felt very comfortable and admittedly enjoyed the attention. 

We sang Davey Crocket. This led to another singing talent show, the King Norman Show, when I was in third grade. The King Norman Show put on talent shows at various schools and the regional winners would be invited to Los Angeles to go up against other kids. It was somewhat similar to American Idol, although very loosly. The kids that won the King Norman Show contest locally got to go to Los Angeles and compete against the other local winners. At my school I was lucky enough to win with my singing 3rd grade partner Mark Rice. Just before going on the air the show pianist worked with all the kids, and that as well got the bug going for playing the piano.

Performing with a band, that didn’t start until high school. The first time we performed publicly was in San Leandro and the band played for a total of $15.00. The name of that first band was “The Trend”. I played the electric organ. 

My first organ was a VOX Continental Organ. It was a very cool thing to have. My second was a Farfisa and my third was a Fender Roads Electric Piano. We even wrote some of our own music. We mostly played the contemporary pop/rock songs of that time, which is what the kids in high school really wanted to hear. 

I remember enjoying composing, it was a fun thing to do. I was not that good of a music reader and felt more comfortable making up what I wanted to play. I found myself as the years went on organizing jam sessions and get togethers with other players. My parents opened our home for these events and I organized the music. I still organize the music today.

I suppose I got my start when we had those sessions at my parents home.

What’s next on the horizon? Well, on Thursday, May 8 at 7pm, I will perform with Sting at Carnegie Hall as part of the annual Save the Rainforest concert which Sting has produced for the last almost 15 years. Also performing will be my long time musical friend drummer/producer Narada Michael Walden.

For this upcoming performance at Carnegie Hall, my job is to transcribe what we will perform and have it ready for the rhythm section >> 3 keyboard players, two guitarists, a bassist, percussionist and drummer.

Legendary reedman Jim Horn is the one who does the horn parts and if there is a string section, either I do it, or I get help from the Trombone player, Tom Malone of the Letterman band. I have another friend that helps if need be, local conductor/arranger Barbara Christmann. Just prior to these shows some of the stars still are trying to decide what to do, so much of what I do is at the very last minute. For me, working with Sting’s Rainforest band has been 10 years of total joy!!

Recently I just finished producing a record for a local Bay Area singer, Karen Blixt. “Mad Hope” is her second record that I’ve produced for her, the first being “Spin This.”. We are going to play at Yoshi’s on the 15th of April in Oakland. The show will be open to the public. On trumpet will be Randy Brecker from the Brecker Brothers. We also will have the great pianist Patrice Rushen, which for me is a great honor to be able to perform with her. On rhythm guitar we have Jose Neto of the Steve Winwood band. Also the great percussionist/drummer Alex Acuna from the Weather Report band will be with us. He is a simply a wonderful percussionist. Also will be bassist Abraham Laboriel, who is the most recorded bass player in history and former “Yellowjackets” member William Kennedy as the drummer. Vocalist Kenny Washington will make a guest appearance as well. He did one song as a duet, “Five and Five”(aka “Take Ten”) For that record I co-composed 8 songs, and arranged and produced it. We recorded it at the Skywalker Studio in Marin County with the great engineer Leslie Ann Jones.

And I’m half way finished with my second production for Dutch singer Ellen Honert. The first one was “Breath of the Soul” and featured Tuck & Patti, the Turtle Island String Quartet, Brazilian vocalist/guitarist Dori Caymmi and many others.

My process of working with the musicians begins with making demos of the songs and sending it to them. That way they get a feel for what I’m looking for. We never rehearse so the more clarity I provide, the better. The process of recording the demos in my San Rafael studio is something I really love to do. It’s an expansion of what I did at my parents home. I organize the people and bring them together to play. 

What does an arranger do exactly? An arranger organizes what the musicians will play. Decides how best to utilize the available instruments and capitalize on the strengths of the players who will be recording. The producer gets the musicians to perform at their highest level and makes sure everything runs smoothly. In my opinion the key is to get the best musicians for the recording. Kind of like cooking … great ingredients allow for the best meal. One has to wear a lot of hats during productions. Needing to stay true to the artist and help realize their vision, as well as help guide them along their path. And to provide a comfortable arena for all of the performers to shine at their best.

I enjoy keeping busy. I teach at UC Jazz Ensembles, I have private students, I teach classes at the Jazzschool, and I participate in Summer Camps, i.e. Jazz Camp West and the Lafayette Summer Music Workshops. I find myself performing all the time as well …

Who are some of the favorite musicians that you have worked to work with and why? When asked who Frank Martin enjoys working with he mused. I enjoy working with Abraham Laboriel, Alex Acuna, William Kennedy he tells us. We have a strong connection with the four of us and the reason is that we all come from a place of joy. They all have perpetual smiles on their faces. Same for guitarist Jose Neto. They love so much what they do and they are masters. They are so joyful to be around. It makes for a wonderful experience.

Generally, those are my favorite people to perform with. Now there is Stevie Wonder, he is a true genius musically. Herbie Hancock – he is a joy and a great inspiration. And my ideal singer is Patti Austin. She is a consummate professional who expects you to be that as well. She is full of joy and life and I love how she communicates with people. I used to work a lot with vocalist Angela Bofill before she had her second stroke. She can get around a little bit now. She needs all our prayers. I go to visit her sometimes. She has a great attitude. After her first stroke she couldn’t speak and with time she went back to speaking at about 85%. She is paralyzed on her left side and is fighting hard. She remains truly inspiring she was a great joy to work with.

What in your opinion makes a great performer? I think one that communicates sincerely. Not only verbally but in what they are playing and singing. Those that park their egos at the door … Many of my favorite musicians have a Jazz background, and many are based in Rhythm and Blues. I love performers that make rhythm of the utmost importance. There are many who just play the song. The great performers always share of themselves and bring something personal to the song.

Are there any suggestions you have for the young musicians in the UC Jazz Ensembles and other inspiring musicians? Yes, be true to yourself and follow your passion. Try to keep that in mind! You are going to hear from a lot of people that you should do something else. That it’s too hard to make it in the arts.That is typically well-intentioned advice, but you can’t take somebodies dream away. You have to have the belief. Follow your passion – attitude is everything!

I tell my students this example. There are a couple of bass players. One says that “there is no work, what am I gonna do?” The other one says “I am so busy!! I got my fifth gig today and I have five more tomorrow.” I tell my students that they are both right. There is no work and in the same town they is too much work. It is not easy, but it is all about the work you put into it. Have a healthy attitude and follow the passion and don’t give up.

How can a novice listener become more knowledgeable about jazz? It is about exposure. Exposure is always the thing. It is like a fine wine if you don’t have the opportunity and if you don’t try it you can’t find out what resonates with you. Exposure to it makes you appreciate it more. Like a good painting, only if you see the painting can you appreciate it. You have to watch and listen. It is a process. My recommendation is that you go to jazz concerts and find out what resonates with you. One artist may resonate with you and may not resonate with another. Maybe just allowing yourself the time to go to Yoshi’s or Anna’s Island and experiencing live music will bring you closer to the music. If you can’t do that use the Internet. The Internet is filled with music of one artist after another. Every style of performer is there! Go to Youtube.com and type in a jazz artists name and you will find him or her performing someplace. It is the same for internet sites like Rhapsody.com and DailyMotion.com. Listen to the music of a jazz artist. Exposure! There is no magical way to appreciate something one doesn’t know.

What is coming up next for you? I am going to be in Bend, Oregon. A local promoter and jazz fan decided to bring together Brazilian guitarist Jose Neto and the great New York based jazz sax player Eric Anderson for a night of Brazilian jazz, along with Brazilian drummer Celso Alberti and myself. Then I am doing some concert work with an Irish Jazz singer Melanie O’Rielly at the Freight & Salvage in Berkeley. Then we are off to LA to perform at the Raven, a club for actors. She has an acting background and we will do a duo. Her style is Irish Jazz ~ traditional music that meets kind of McCoy Tyner!. Then I am starting a recording project with her, writing music inspired by the writings of James Joyce. That should be interesting. And the night after the Raven will perform in a jazz quartet with New York drummer Paul Peress and players I’ve yet to meet, at Spaghetini’s, a Jazz Club in LA. Then comes performance at Carnegie Hall with Sting. I am blessed to be busy doing what I love ~ music music music!! Who knew that those jam sessions at my parents home would spark a career in music …

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Karen Blixt and Frank Martin’s second record will be performed at Yoshi’s April 15th, 2008

Karen Blixt -Mad Hope
Frank Martin on piano with Karen Blixt

Karen Blixt and her “Mad Hope” ~ Frank’s second record he produced for Karen Blixt. Yoshi’s on the 15th April in Oakland. The show will be open to the public. On trumpet will be Randy Brecker from the Brecker Brothers. Frank Martin on piano and keyboard. We also will have well known pianist Patrice Rushen. On guitar will be Jose Neto of the Steve Winwood band. On percussion will be Alex Acuna from the Weather Report band. Bassist Abraham Laboriel, who is the most recorded bass player in history and former Yellowjacket member William Kennedy as the drummer will round out the rhythm section. Vocalist Kenny Washington will make a guest appearance as well. On the CD he recorded one song as a duet with Karen.


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Frank Martin, Head of the UC Jazz Advanced Combo I

Frank Martin - Arranger/Conductor/Keyboardist

 Arranger/conductor/keyboardist Frank Martin has performed and/or recorded with a variety of artists that include Andrea Bocelli, Sting, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Steve Winwood, Whitney Houston, Ray Charles, Diana Ross, Chris Isaak, Tevin Campbell, Cheryl Crow, Philip Bailey, James Taylor, Joe Cocker, Billy Joel, and Madonna.

In the jazz world of music his performance credits include Flora Purim & Airto Moriera, Herbie Hancock, John McLaughlin, Narada Michael Walden, Stanley Jordan, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Torme, Bobby McFerrin, John Handy, Ramsey Lewis, Joe Farrell, and the Slide Hampton Big Band.
Orchestra performances included concerts with the San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Chamber Orchestra, and the Orchestra of St. Lukes (New York Philharmonic Orchestra).

As a producer he has worked with such artists as Al Jarreau, Lisa Fischer, Bobby McFerrin’s Voicestra, the Award Winning A Cappella group SoVoSo, Gospel vocalists NuVision, story telling Jazz vocalist Rhiannon, Jazz guitarist Mimi Fox featuring organist Joey DeFrancesco and vocalist Angela Bofill, jazz vocalist Karin Blixt featuring Buddy Montgomery, Russell Ferrante, Bruce Forman, Alex Acuna, and William Kennedy, as well as Dutch vocalist Ellen Honert featuring Dori Caymmi, Abraham Laboriel, Turtle Island String Quartet, Tuck & Patti, and Pedro Eustache.

As Musical Director he has toured with such artists as Patti Austin, Angela Bofill, Narada Michael Walden, Mickey Thomas, Roy Ares, Tevin Campbell, and Clarence Clemens.

For two years he also worked as assistant Musical Director for The Afternoon Show on KPIX Television in San Francisco, California. Currently on staff as an educator at the Jazzschool in Berkeley, California, he is in demand as a clinician both in the United States, having taught at the Naropa Institute in Boulder Colorado, Stanford Jazz Workshops at Stanford University, as well as in Europe at the acclaimed SAMI Institute in Sweden. Annual music summer camps include JazzCampWest and the Lafayette Summer Music Workshops.

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Frank Martin

Frank Martin infuses the Advanced Combo I with the professionalism and creativity he is so famous and beloved for.

Frank Martin is a great performer and a wonderful teacher. A wide range of compositional techniques and musical devices are explored and applied to class assignments including: the use of different rhythmic feels and grooves; reharmonization; form changes; innovative intros, outros, codas and vamps; and alterations to melody and lyrics. Students sing and/or play selected repertoire in a variety of styles and learn how to make even the most common standards sound new. Read feature article about Frank Martin

In the News 

Frank Martin Keyboard virtuoso/arranger/musical director Frank Martin has amassed a very impressive track record working with world-class performers in a diverse array of musical styles. In the pop arena, Martin has performed and/or recorded with stars that include Sting, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Steve Winwood, Whitney Houston, Ray Charles, Diana Ross, Chris Isaak, Andrea Bocelli, Cheryl Crow, Philip Bailey, James Taylor, Joe Cocker, Billy Joel, Madonna and Ricki Martin. In the jazz world, his performance credits include Flora Purim & Airto Moriera, Herbie Hancock, John McLaughlin, Dizzy Gilespie, Mel Torme, Bobby McFerrin, John Handy, Ramsey Lewis, Joe Farrell and the Slide Hampton Big Band. Orchestra performances have included concerts with the San Francisco Symphony, San Francisco Chamber Orchestra and the “Orchestra of St. Lukes” (New York Philharmonic Orchestra). 

As a producer, he has worked with high-profile artists such as Al Jarreau, Bobby McFerrin’s “Voicestra,” SoVoSo,” Joey DeFrancesco and Alex Acuña, Jazz guitarist Mimi Fox, vocalist Angela Bofill and the Turtle Island String Quartet. As musical director, he has toured with such artists as Patti Austin, Angela Bofill, Narada Michael Walden, Mickey Thomas, Roy Ayres, and Clarence Clemens. Currently, Martin is on staff at the University of California in Berkeley as well as the Jazzschool in Berkeley, California. He is in demand as a clinician both in the United States and in Europe. 

Great musicians make What’s New, Pussycat? come alive and help Lisa B keep the atmosphere fun and swinging. Ben Flint’s keyboards on the first two tracks help set the tone, and Frank Martin’s clever piano playing on the rest of the disc complements Lisa B’s singing perfectly (check out the electric piano in “Cha Cha de la Gata (Kitty-Cat Cha)”). The recording is vibrant and detailed. What’s New Pussycat? is fun, impressively played and sung, and, yes, very sexy.” SoundstageAV.com, Joseph Taylor

Frank Martin’s “In the Pocket” class on rhythm is super-fun. You’ll be on your feet and moving. Frank gives enough handouts that you’ll have two years’ worth of practice materials by the end of the class. Student on yelp.com 2009 

Multi-Platinum record winner, composer/keyboardist Frank Martin has performed his edgy-jazz style with everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to Sting and Elton John. Count on hearing a jazz trio of the highest of caliber — pushing the limits of harmony and improvisation in modern jazz expressions. http://www.sanjosejazz.org 

Frank Martin’s clever piano playing on the rest of the disc complements Lisa B’s singing perfectly (check out the electric piano in ‘Cha Cha de la Gata (Kitty-Cat Cha)’). The recording is vibrant and detailed. ‘What’s New Pussycat?’ is fun, impressively played and sung, and, yes, very sexy.” Radio stations across the country have jumped on the record. www.jazz review.com 

Convergence by Ian Dogole & Hemispheres offers up a kaleidoscopic brew of innovative, adventurous Jazz spiced with flavors from around the globe. Blending African, Middle Eastern, Asian and South American instruments with more traditional Jazz instrumentation and song forms, percussionist Ian Dogole, along with Grammy-nominated woodwind virtuosi Paul McCandless (with Oregon) and Sheldon Brown (formerly with Omar Sosa), bassist/flutist Bill Douglass (with Marian McPartland and Mose Allison), and Frank Martin take their listeners on an unforgettable aural journey that it is simply out of this world. www.jazzheads.com 

Keyboard virtuoso/arranger/musical director Frank Martin has amassed a very impressive track record working with world-class performers in a diverse array … www.jazzheads.com 

“Jazzmérica,” is produced by three-time Grammy nominee Wayne Wallace and boasts an all-star band including Frank Martin, John Santos, Ricardo Peixoto, Michael Spiro, Paul Van Wangeningen, David Belove, Edgardo Cambón, Melecio Magdaluyo and many others. 

Convergence by Ian Dogole & Hemispheres offers up a kaleidoscopic brew of innovative, adventurous Jazz spiced with flavors from around the globe. Blending African, Middle Eastern, Asian and South American instruments with more traditional Jazz instrumentation and song forms, percussionist Ian Dogole, along with Grammy-nominated woodwind virtuosi Paul McCandless (with Oregon) and Sheldon Brown (formerly with Omar Sosa), bassist/flutist Bill Douglass (with Marian McPartland and Mose Allison), and Frank Martin take their listeners on an unforgettable aural journey that it is simply out of this world. www.jazzheads.com 

Keyboard virtuoso/arranger/musical director Frank Martin has amassed a very impressive track record working with world-class performers in a diverse array … www.jazzheads.com 

Read feature article about Frank Martin 

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UC Jazz Ensembles

UC Jazz Ensembles – Advanced Combos 

UC Jazz Ensembles in 2007

Advanced Combos

The Advanced Combo consist of the top players in UC Jazz Ensembles. Placement in these combos is restricted. The advanced combos perform jazz standards, challenging and contemporary material such as Dave Liebman and Chick Corea, and original compositions. Advanced musicians should have a thorough understanding of bebop and contemporary improvisation styles, and a familiarity with the musical languages of Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Bill Evans, etc. Students should know diatonic and non-diatonic jazz harmonic theory and have memorized several jazz standards. They should have technical fluency on their instrument and possess advanced jazz musicianship skills, including sight-reading, transposition, odd-meter playing, and pitch/chord recognition, although the combos will continue to work in all of these areas. Advanced combos frequently perform at highly visible venues on and off campus and perform biannually at our end of semester concerts with the UC Jazz Big Band.

Instructor: Ted Moore

Personnel:

  Shomik Chakravarty, guitar

  Matt Staley, guitar

  Kevin Wang, piano

  Noah Whitfield, bass

  Anand Badri, drums

Dan Zinn’s Advanced Combo

Instructor: Dan Zinn

Personnel:

  Trevor Orr, alto

  Robert Barner, guitar

  Chris Allen, piano

  Joe Constantini, bass

  Nick Duffy, drums

Frank Martin’s Advanced Combo

Instructor: Frank Martin

Personnel:

  Richard Conway, trumpet

  Alex Siegel, guitar

  Andrew Hutchinson, piano

  Seabrien Arata, drums

  Ali Warrick, drums

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