Introducing Karlsson Design

Elegance and Beauty are making a Comeback in Finland

Supernovatar1_OK_web

Jere Hietala, Photography

Jere Hietala’s unique style has brought him international acclaim. Jere Hietala prefers to work with fashion designers, advertising agencies, and major music labels. He was awarded the First prize in a national Finnish Photography contest.
www.jerehietala.com

Jere Hietala photographed Black Butterfly and Fire.

Okko Oinonen

“I aim to create timeless and meaningful images that reflect the mood of our time by using dramatic stories in all fields of photography. My subjects are caught in between the worlds of reality and fiction. A photograph tells a story, it can be seen as a silent film. To me, photography is like devising a carefully planned renaissance painting, where artistic form is coherent with the intellectual content. I create the style depending on the subject matter. The technical details and direction are as important as the idea.

Each photograph has to be perfect, like a heightened hyper-reality. Digital manipulation of the picture can be a useful technique, but only if it is stylistically consistent with the idea itself.” — Okko Oinonen

Snow Queen and many others.

Internet: www.okkooinonen.com

Janne Suono, Stylist

They are famous for their ability to make the most advantage of light. Their photoshoots are flawless. They are fun to work with.

www.jannesuono.com

and

www.jonaslundqvist.com

Nina Hyvarinen

Nina is like a samurai in the package of a butterfly. Kalervo has seen many dancers and to him she is the best in the world. She is rising out of the earth with strength and grace. He is not alone. The press celebrates her all around the world, here is one quote by Auli Räsänen.

“Nina Hyvärinen surprised by her sensual solo The Rite in which her emphatic body bent to the choreography showing the influence of the African. Supple pelvis, shigering muscles and breathing dance – all were enjoyable to see.

Hyvärinen walks her own ways and it feels now that she has taken off her uniform of the ballerina. I hope that she keeps her career as a wide contemporary dancer – in a field which she is ideal for herself”.

Auli Räsänen
Helsingin Sanomat, Dec 20th 2002

Nina is the principal dancer in Ultrablue Fashion Show video

 


Model Anette in Lisa Marie pantsuit, design by Niina and Kalerlvo Karlsson, photo by Jere Hietala.

Anette - Blue Face
Anette – Blueface – Aurora Borealis by Kalervo and Niina Karlsson, photo by Jere Hietala

 

Produced by RioVida Networks, LLC © All Rights Reserved 2009

 


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UC Jazz Spring Concert at 7pm at Alumni House

UC Jazz Performers

UC Jazz will have its Spring Concert on Friday April 23 at 7 pm at the Alumni House and we will have an online auction April 20-30, 2010

We need your donations for this silent auction. Please donate products, art work, DVDs, CDs, trips, restaurant coupons, cars, designer outfits, accessories or certificate to your retail outlet or a specific product. Your contributions will be valued and we will promote them to our loyal audience of about 6 000 readers. Please contact Carol Suveda about your donation and provide Edie Okamoto at eokamoto@riovida.net with your product photo and a press release.

Additionally your donation is tax deductible. Your participation will assure that the UC Jazz Ensembles will continue to thrive. The UC Jazz Ensembles are a student run organization since the late sixties. Since it is a student run organization – meaning that it provides engineering, information systems students, any student that is NOT enrolled in the accredited music program a chance to enjoy music. Therefore, as UC Berkeley along with many other educational institutions is facing ever deeper budget cuts, the UC Jazz Ensembles program is particularly affected.

Please contact Student Activities Director, Carole Suveda, to arrange pickup of your donations at (510) 643-2662.

or I have enclosed or will deliver the donation to UC Jazz Ensembles to  72 Cesar Chavez Center # 4280 * Berkeley, CA  94720-4280 or FAX (510) 643-9463

o I would like UC Jazz to create a gift certificate describing my donation.

o I have enclosed a business card or brochure to give to the winning bidder.

o I would like my donation picked up.  Best time to call: ______________________P

The University of California is a non-profit organization; your donation is tax deductible. (Tax ID #94-6002123) 
Click for a copy of this form for your records.

Please reply by no later than April 5th. Your assistance and contribution is much appreciated.

TED MOORE WATCH

On March 12, Ted’s group, “Studio 104,” will perform in concert at the Jazz School in Berkeley. This concert will feature UC Jazz faculty members Dann Zinn and Frank Martin, as well as Kai Eckhardt (formerly with John McLaughlin) on bass

Frank Martin Watch

From intense high energy fusion to Indian influenced improvisations, from dense and heavy darkish atmospheres to lyrical moods, Claude Pauly’s new CD featuring bassist Kai Eckhardt (John McLaughlin, Garaj Mahal) , drummer Alan Hertz (Scott Henderson, Garaj Mahal) and keyboardist Frank Martin ( John McLaughlin, Richard Bona, Sting…) is a high density experience of the different landscapes of electric jazz fusion guitar playing and writing. But this isn’t just another guitar album. This CD is drenched in what it’s actually all about….music!. Fans of Allan Holdsworth, John McLaughlin, Scott Henderson, Greg Howe will absolutely dig this kick butt album . Much recommended.

Claude Pauly (guitars); Kai Eckhardt (bass); Alan Hertz (drums); Frank Martin (piano,keyboards). Download Sampler

Dann Zinn Watch

Dann Zinn will perform on Monday, Mar 8th, 2010 with Joe DeRose CD Release Party. Yoshi’s Oakland, 8PM

Born in San Jose, California, Joe has been playing the drums since the age of five. He was first taught at home by his older brother Gino. He later became active playing in school bands and is an alumni of the Alum Rock Jazz Band (88). At age 14, Joe began playing professionally around the San Francisco bay area. He has had the honor of studying with such greats as Louie Bellson, Joe Porcaro, Freddie Grubber, Wally Schnalle, Bryant Mills, Karl Carter, John Ramsay, Rick Considine, Lewis Nash, Kenwood Denard, Mike Mangini and many others. In 1994, Joe followed his dream and moved to Boston to attend the Berklee College of Music. The Berklee experience was everything Joe could have imagined. He graduated in 1998, with a Bachelors in Performance, Magna Cum Laude. While living in Boston, Joe toured with R&B, Blues diva, Toni Lynn Washington. Now that Joe has moved back to San Jose he has most recently finished two European tours with Hip-Hop artist, Kofy Brown, and a northern California tour with Italian tenor, Pasquale Esposito. He also is a member of corporate party band Groove Nugget, Jazz trio, Jazzfunkshun, and leads his own Jazz-Fusion based group, Joe De Rose and Amici. Joe also in November 2006 had the honor of performing his debut drum clinic for San Jose Pro Drum opening for drum legend, Tommy Aldridge. Joe freelances all over the bay area with styles ranging from Funk, Hip-Hop, Reggae, Fusion, Rock, Latin to Jazz. In October of 2008, Joe completed a Japanese tour with jazz vocalist, Yoshiko Oda and The Hristo Vitchev quartet. They performed all over Japan including the Okazaki Jazz Festival.

GLENN RICHMAN WATCH

Jazzschool faculty member Glenn Richman will be appearing at Yoshi’s SF with Cedar Walton, Slide Hampton, Jimmy Heath, Bobby Hutcherson and Eddie Marshall March 12-14, 2010.

Sign-up or stop UC Jazz Newsletter subscription by contacting us at info@riovida.net

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Artist Highlight – Angela Bofill

co-authors Junko Kawaii / Edie Okamoto

Angela Bofill – Tonight I Give In (Soul Train 1983)

Angela Bofill known as a R&B, Soul, and Jazz vocalist. Whenever she ventured into Jazz she enchanted audiences with her distinctive and clear voice. Angela no longer performs since she is now partially paralyzed. She was released from intensive care on January 15, 2009. She now is working hard on her speech and physical therapy. Ms. Bofill did not have health insurance and therefore thanks her fans, friends, and family who have helped her through this trying time. Learn how you can help on her website: www.angelabofill.com 

Angela Bofill was born to a Cuban father and Puerto Rican mother. She performed with Ricardo Morrero & the Group and Dance Theater of Harlem. After completing her studies in California, Bofill was introduced by her friend, jazz flutist Dave Valentin, to Dave Grusin and Larry Rosen of GRP records, and they signed her for her 1978 debut, Angie. The album was a breakout smash on contemporary jazz radio and the tastefully arranged jazz vocal disc showed a gifted young artist with a rich voice beyond her years. 

Featuring a number of great cuts, including most notably a cover of This Time I’ll Be Sweeter, Angie became one of the year’s biggest jazz albums. 

1979 she followed her success with “Angel of the Night” like the fantastic “What I Wouldn’t Do” and softer tracks such as “I try.”

Angela Bofill on the Johnny Carson Show

She drew the attention of star producer Clive Davis. He convinced Arista Records to purchase her GRP contract. She was teamed with fabuluous writer/producer Narada Michael Walden for Something About You, which was a great success. 

Angela Bofill stretched the boundaries for her jazz fans with this new album which provided her with some of the best material of her career, including the stepper “Holding Out For Love” and the wonderful ballads “Break It To Me Gently” and Earl Klugh’s “You Should Know By Now.” 

Angela Bofill is a warm-hearted and lovely woman that inspires great passion from her listeners. One reviewer, Jazysol79, stated: “Angela Bofill’s voice is a true wonder. Exotic and exhilirating, sweet and soothing, picturesque and inviting. She conjures vivid imagery with her interpretations. I discovered “Angie” about five years ago not too long after I started college. I picked up a vinyl copy, and I have been in love with Angela ever since. This beautifully packaged reissue truly does the album justice. “Under the Moon and Over the Sky” is a jazz/fusion delight; it’s Afro-Cuban rhythms are intoxicating. The highs and lows Bofill hits will give you chills. It is that kind of drama that makes this record a compelling listen. Her definitive take on “This Time I’ll Be Sweeter” is a joyous, moving masterpiece. Her pleas of “have faith in me” are almost palpable. But in my opinion, the best track is “The Only Thing I Would Wish For.” The jazzy vocal arrangement and flute work by Dave Valentin paint a real picture of what GRP was all about in its infancy. The liner notes and packaging are also great. So this CD is well worth the price… it is a moving experience.” 

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UC Jazz Ensembles Fundraising Concert at Yoshi’s Monday, October 27, 2008

Gary Johnson, Bassist, at UC Jazz Ensembles show great promise. He is fabulous.
Gary Johnson – Bassist at the UC Jazz Ensembles


The UC Jazz Fall 2008 Fundraiser will be held on Monday, October 27, 2008 at Yoshi’s Oakland. Please order tickets now – thank you for your support! 

UC Jazz Ensembles to perform at
Yoshi’s in Oakland
Monday, October 27, 2008 

A Fundraiser and Night of Jazz in honor of Robert Cole, Director of Cal Performances and Student Musical Activities with optional Pre-Concert Dinner and Silent Auction

Enjoy a lovely dinner, silent auction and or a marvelous concert. 

Please make your concert reservations now! 

8 pm General Admission is $25
8 pm Student is $10

10 pm General Admission is $15
10 pm Student is $10

Let’s join and save the music program together. With your assistance we can keep this musical tradition alive despite the economic conditions and perhaps especially because of the economic condition. A thriving culture, celebration of music has long brought joy and a wonderful quality of life to our State. We need musicians of fine quality and people who enjoy and appreciate great music. Please support our effort to keep the UC Jazz Ensembles program going. Funding for this fine music program has been truly needed. 

To RSVP for the Dinner and Shows package and for more information about opportunities for sponsorship, program ads, auction donations and contributions in honor of Robert Cole and UC Jazz in general, please go to ucjazz.berkeley.edu or call (510) 643-2662.

Learn about last year’s fundraiser – Click 

Join us to honor Robert Cole

In his words: While every new season is a challenge and an opportunity, the 2008/09 Season takes on particular meaning for me as it is the last in my 23-year tenure as Director of Cal Performances. Therefore, I hope you’ll agree that it is a special one indeed, and unlike any other in our history! It is a season that has been specifically designed to please you in ways both large and small, including the return of many of the great artists that have been associated with Cal Performances over the years, the introduction of exciting new talents in their Bay Area debuts, and the inclusion of specially requested works on the programs of our Chamber Series and more. 

Learn more about Robert Cole MORE 

Ted Moore, Director of UC Jazz Ensembles

Mr. Moore is Director of UC Jazz Ensembles at UC Berkeley. Aside from his administrative duties, he offers his skills as the Percussion Director of UC Jazz Ensembles Advanced Combo II and the Improv Workshop.

A graduate of the Eastman School of Music, Ted Moore has toured the world with Paul Winter, Marian McPartland, Stan Getz, Joe Williams, Eric Gale, Jack Wilkins, Gene Bertonzini, Joey DeFrancesco, and many others. For several years, he lived in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, performing timpani and percussion with the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra, as well as touring and recording with one of Brazil’s leading saxophonists, Victor Assis Brasil. Mr. Moore has composed original scores for several films and television series, including the NOVA science series on PBS. MORE 

Thank you all for your support of UC Jazz Ensembles! 

Event and Sponsorship Information 

Member Support Services Find out about the UC Jazz Club membership benefits, and how you may wish to contribute and interact with other volunteer and member companies. 

Event and Sponsorship Information 

Edie Okamoto 

eokamoto@riovida.net For more information about donations please contact

Carol Suveda
carols@sma.berkeley.edu For more information about UC Jazz please contact

Ted Moore
tmoore@ucjazz.berkeley.edu 

Sign-up or stop UC Jazz Newsletter subscription by contacting us at info@riovida.net 

About the UC Jazz Ensembes 

The UC Jazz Club was founded by the students of UC Jazz Ensembles and its faculty. Our goal is to share our fine tradition of Jazz with our members and the community at large. 

UC Jazz Ensembles have been teaching students since 1966. We hope our members will enjoy our monthly newsletter, our performances and most importantly we hope you will support our effort to expand our popular program. 

We invite donors and volunteers to continue to support our growing program and to join us now. 

The UC Jazz Club offers several unique sponsorship opportunities which will support us in our goal to remodel the UC Jazz studios. 

With your support we will also maintain and grow our current resources in the studios. This includes the purchase and maintenance of our equipment, expanding and renovating our practice areas, adding to our jazz library and ultimately making recordings of our big band and ensembles live performances. 

Our goal is to uphold the UC Jazz tradition which has enchanted the world. We have taught students how to carry on this wonderful musical tradition with great success. Jazz has become mainstream and is becoming increasingly popular. 

Please contact Ted Moore, director of UC Jazz Ensembles to learn about the program. You may also contact RioVida Networks for assistance to set up interviews with the faculty, students and fund-raising committee.

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Leigh Jones Debut CD “Music In My Soul”

Leigh Jones "Music in our Soul"
Leigh Jones “Music in our Soul”

We recommend you listen to this new album and go to Leigh Jones’ performance when she comes to town. She reminds us why the UC Jazz Ensembles must have vocals lessons again. The world needs female vocalists like Leigh Jones that have intelligence and poise. 

“Music in my Soul” debuted with 13 tracks. What’s interesting about Jones is that she doesn’t seem to fall into the studio pre-fab, female pop singers, who sometimes don’t have the musical chops to back it up. Her CD is worth taking a listen to. If you give her a chance, you may be hooked in enough to listen to the entire CD, like I was. It definitely has a mellow, jazzy feel to it. Some standout tracks: “Music,” “Free Fall” “All This Love,” “Have it Your Way,” “Sick of Fools” and “I’m Leavin’ You.” Copy Editor Felicia, CNN.com 

Only once in an era does a young performer come along who is so dazzling, so captivating and so undeniable in their talent that they gather the gale force of the most respected icons in the business beneath their wings. Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Leigh Jones is that amazing once in a lifetime artist. Jazz HQ 

With wide ranging musical influences from Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and Marvin Gaye, to D’Angelo, Jill Scott and Joss Stone, Leigh Jones has managed to carve out a niche in the extremely competitive world of the music business.  Her debut album on Peak Records entitled “Music In My Soul” is a definitive statement from this dynamic, new artist. Very personal in nature, this album features the unique song styling that is sultry, sexy and insightful. Her rich, soulful style mixed with jazz and R & B influences create a distinct retro sound throughout the album. Kerry Gordy, KGE Entertainment, manages her career and produced her album with assistance of Lorenzo Pryor, Bruce Fisher, and input from his father Berry Gordy. 

David Nathan of Soul Music asked Leigh Jones: “How did you originally meet Kerry Gordy?” Leigh Jones answered: When I was at a performing arts school in Los Angeles, I worked with a producer, Lorenzo Pryor. We recorded a few things as a way for me to get my foot in the door but I shook my head because the kind of things we were doing were a little ‘punk’-y and not really where my heart was musically. I worked with some other producers who were looking more for a Britney Spears/Christina Aguilera kind of singer and I was not going to be slithering around onstage! 

Lorenzo told me he had a good friend, Kerry(Gordy), who was looking for a project and after we met, he told me, ‘100 girls came in before you.’ The next day, we were recording! “Sick Of Fools” was one of the first three songs we ever did together.

Everything started from there. Since last September the CD shot up the charts to rave reviews, deservedly so. The CD features songs that are heartfelt, have intelligent and timely lyrics, with a sound that gives you the feeling instantly that you are listening to a classic hit album. Kerry Gordy and Leigh Jones successfully bring intelligence back into their new music while keeping this jazzy CD young and fresh. Watch her “Free Fall” video on U-tube MORE

“A star is born! Finally, a fresh voice, a musical talent not seen for at least a generation. I am stunned. Ms. Jones has the voice, the musical training and the expressive feeling to interpret the songs well chosen for this album.”
-Raymondo, A reviewer, www.barnesandnoble.com

“blue-eyed soul.” Once a label applied to white musicians who sang with an R&B influence, it’s been tossed around so often that any non-black performer, is labeled as such. Fortunately for true soul fans, Leigh Jones overcomes this cliché with her exquisitely enjoyable debut, Music in My Soul.
-Melody Charles, Soul Tracks

“Leigh Jones wins!!! “Favorite Female Breakout Artist of the Year Award” by the “American Society of Young Musicians” in Las Vegas along with Justin Timberlake and Wayne Newton.”
-ASYM, 16Th Annual ASYM Awards

“Throughout my career I have been blessed to discover many great musical talents. I feel Leigh Jones is destined to be one of the next great stars. She can do it all – Pop, R&B, Jazz and Blues. She’s awesome!” -Berry Gordy
-Berry Gordy, Music in My Soul

Talking Smooth Jazz welcomes, singer/songwriter and new Peak Records recording artist Leigh Jones. Destined to be herald as possibly the most naturally soulful white female R&B singer since Teena Marie.”
-Robin Loves Music, A reviewer, Talking Smooth Jazz 

THIS LADY IS QUITE SIMPLY THIS LADY IS QUITE SIMPLY STUNNING. Everyone should buy 2 cds cause you are definitely gonna wear out the first one. GO BUY THE CD Lets have a crossover hit. “
-Dave the Rave, Soul Tracks MORE 

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Artist Highlight – Stanley Jordan

Celebrating grammy-award nominated
Stanley Jordan

Ranie Smith, Executive Director of the UC Jazz Club, honored Stanley Jordan at one of the first Ranie’s Jazz Salon functions. He held the function at Jim Dennis Photography Studio. Everyone had a wonderful time and I encourage you to get in touch with us to be put on this special invitation list. The gatherings are for UC Jazz Club members and the press only. Lloyd Gregory and Rolando Morales were present at the function to honor Stanley Jordan.

Stanley Jordan performs “All Blues” of his “State of Nature CD”

Stanley Jordan, world renowned musician and now holistic philosopher, has released a new CD “State of Nature”. It is a true gift. 

“State of Nature” promises to become a hit. It combines Jordan’s magical ability to compose music that inspires and refreshes with his amazing musical skill. When listening to the album you are taken on a magical journey that is both uplifting and enlightening. Stanley brings nature to life and urges us to embrace it while at the same time enjoying our humanity as part of nature. The CD starts with “A Place in Space” which is fun to listen to. It evokes a feeling of bouncing harmoniously in space among many other stars and planets. This composition is melodic and modern. It immediately demonstrates Jordan’s ability to play guitar in a way that hardly anyone else can match. The notes are bouncing, echoing, flowing, and they create a feeling of richness and fullness that reminds us that we are part of a very big mysterious world. Jordan asks us with his commentary in the liner notes to become conscious and aware of this vast and mysterious Universe. He suggests that as we become aware of the infinite vastness of space we will naturally grow to love and care for our precious planet, our home called Earth.
 
He continues on with “All Blues”. This composition brings us right back down to earth with its bluesy and smoky sound. It reminds us that we are part of everyone and everything. We are part of the All. Stanley Jordan invites us along this musical journey and into his musical mind with the accompanying poem in the liner notes:  “Universal and cool, blowing indigo riffs to syncopate the primordial swing. Hip changes reverberate for Miles and stretch modal and blue across the landscape of now.” Like his music, Stanley Jordan is so very, very cool!
 
With “Forest Garden” Jordan increases the sophistication in this haunting and beautiful sonata by bringing in natural sounds of birds, the sound of a breeze in the leaves and wolves howling in the background. His guitar sounds classic and pure. Meta Weiss on cello perfectly compliments Stanley’s harmonies, and percussionist Hartt Steams is breezy, transporting you to this peaceful outdoor garden setting. Here Stanley succeeds in creating a feeling of refreshing peace. In his poem he describes the feeling: “In a perfect state of original oneness all things and beings in the garden simply are. The arrival of humankind brings a new awareness and a new capacity for compassion.”

Jordan then brings us the moving and mournful popular love song “Insensatez” by Jobim, who not only mourns his lost love but also his own behavior that brought about the loss. Stanley Jordan’s rendition of the song is beautiful. In his liner notes he reminds us that often our callous behavior is unintended. He muses that perhaps we shut down our empathy precisely because we are so sensitive, too sensitive to allow ourselves to feel the pain we cause others because it might become too overwhelming.

We are healed by the next piece which is the wonderful “Mozart’s Piano Concierto #21- Andante in F” played flawlessly by Jordan as a celebration of our own potential for greatness. We can bask in the perfection of Mozart’s composition while realizing how complex and wonderful we are. Within each of us slumbers this great potential.

Stanley Jordan and Mozart’s Piano Concierto #21

“Song for my Father” is included as a tribute to David Jordan, Stanley’s own father. This Horace Silver classic is a perfect fit on this wonderful journey. Peaceful, energetic and playful, it lets us all wander down memory lane. Stanley Jordan, Song for my Father – live in Paris “Mindgames 1, 2, & 3” are Stanley Jordan’s own brief compositions which bring nice transitions between songs. Stanley urges us to take mental breaks and to exercise our minds regularly. Read the full poem in the liner notes. Stanley is not just an amazing musician but also a wonderful poet and philosopher.
 
“Ocean Breeze,” composed by Jordan and sitarist Jay Kishor, is a perfect meeting of East and West. It is harmonious and serene. Stanley brings cool Western poise to this song and Jay’s sitar brings Eastern serenity. Together they refresh our spirit.
 
Jordan’s composition “Healing Waves” is beautiful, and promises to be an instant classic. In true Stanley Jordan style it combines abstract music with rich melodies and harmonies. It is at once demanding and soothing. It evokes many feelings, assisting with the release of emotions and eventually bringing one back to a harmonious, peaceful and centered place. If you like classical music you will definitely love this piece.
 
“Shadow Dance” displays the richness of the full Stanley Jordan sound. It may be a little reminiscent of Kitaro or of Santana. This piece is melodic, beautiful and rich, yet easy to listen to. I needed to sit back and listen to it over and over again. Jordan bares his soul with this song and allows us to delve deeply into our own. In his liner notes poem he ends: “Time Passes. Somewhere in the distance I hear bells. A ray of golden light has pierced the gray clouds and awakened me.” This song is like a cosmic and mystical journey home.
 
After another “Mind Games” break we come to “Prayer for the Sea,” another original on this CD. It is modern, and Stanley succeeds in bringing out his abstract musical style in a deeply harmonious way. This song is relaxing like a day at the beach on a sunny Spring afternoon. It is also reminiscent of the first song “A Place in Space” on the album, yet this time is feels close and cozy. Prayer for the Sea reminds us that we need to care for ourselves, our home “Earth” and especially our oceans which cover 70% of the earth. Let’s become aware and conscious of the need to preserve water before it becomes another “oil crisis. “
 
“State of Nature” ends with the old-school hit “Steppin’ Out” and brings the CD to a joyous ending. After this musical journey I am ready to embrace my humanity and Stanley Jordan’s CD and I are ready for “Steppin’ Out”. I am energized yet relaxed. What a great musical experience!
 
Stanley Jordan came to prominence with the release of his 1985 debut album Magic Touch, which sold over 500,000 copies. Magic Touch placed him at the forefront of re-launching the legendary Blue Note Records into a contemporary entity of jazz and beyond, as well as establishing Stanley Jordan as among the most distinctive and refreshing new voices of the electric guitar. He has enchanted millions of listeners around the world ever since.

I recommend that you go out and buy Jordan’s new CD. It is totally worth it and available at all major music retail outlets. If you can catch his show try to see him. Stanley is once again proofs to be amazing!

From the moment he made his debut in 1985 with the gold-selling Grammy© nominated album MagicTouch, guitar virtuoso Stanley Jordan has proven himself as a forward thinking innovator. With his nimbly executed “touch” or “tap” technique, he ushered a dazzling and spellbinding new sound into the world of progressive instrumental music.

Over the course of five major recordings and several smaller independent releases, Stanley has explored earthly and astral musical trailways. Because of the extraordinary originality of his approach to guitar, Stanley has been looked upon first and foremost as a musical original, orbiting in an artistic universe without predecessor or immediate successor.

With his groundbreaking 2007 album, “State Of Nature” his debut for the Mack Avenue label, Stanley Jordan makes another bold step by using his music to musically illustrate profound and unifying truths about man’s relationship to nature and humankind.


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Artist Highlight – Oscar Peterson

Oscar Peterson

“The music field was the first to break down racial barriers, because in order to play together, you have to love the people you are playing with, and if you have any racial inhibitions, you wouldn’t be able to do that.” ~ Oscar Peterson

Internationally renowned jazz pianist Oscar Peterson was called the “Maharaja of the keyboard” by Duke Ellington, “O.P.” by his friends, and was a member of jazz royalty. He released over 200 recordings, won seven Grammy Awards, and received other numerous awards and honors over the course of his career. He is considered to have been one of the greatest pianists of all time, who played thousands of live concerts to audiences worldwide in a career lasting more than 65 years. 

Oscar Peterson was born on August 15, 1925 in Montreal, Canada. His father, Daniel Peterson, a porter with Canadian Pacific Railways, lived in Canada since 1917. He met Oscars’ mother, Kathleen Olivia John, in Montreal, where she was domestic worker. They had five children. 

Daniel Peterson was an avid musician and insisted that all five of his children studied music. Oscar began playing the trumpet at the age of five. He got tuberculosis and spent 14 months in the hospital. His lungs became quite damaged so he could no longer play the trumpet. So he chose to play the piano. Their father, who learned to play piano on his own while in the Merchant Marine Academy, taught his children all he could until they achieved a certain proficiency. During his high school years, Oscar studied with an accomplished classical pianist, Hungarian Paul de Marky, a student of Istvan Thomán who was himself a pupil of Franz Liszt. Oscar Peterson’s training was predominantly based on classical piano, with inspirations from the Well Tempered Clavier, the Goldberg Variations, and the The Art of Fugue, as these piano pieces are essential for every serious pianist. Meanwhile Oscar Peterson was captivated by traditional jazz and learned several ragtime songs, especially the boogie-woogie. At that time Peterson was called “the Brown Bomber of the Boogie-Woogie.” Paul de Marky encouraged Oscar to believe that he had something special to give to the music world. At age nine Peterson played piano with control that impressed professional musicians. For many years his piano studies included four to six hours of practice daily.

Art Tatum a very famous pianist during that era was introduced to Oscar by his father who played Art Tatum’s Tiger Rag record for him. Oscar was so intimidated by what he heard that he didn’t touch the piano for a month. At 14 years of age, Oscar’s older sister Daisy Sweeney a notable classical piano teacher scheduled an audition for a CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) national amateur contest. Oscar won the competition. This opened the doors to performances on a weekly broadcast show, on a Montreal radio station, called Fifteen Minutes’ Piano Rambling and later performances on a national CBC broadcast called The Happy Gang. He regularly played with the Montreal High School Victory Serenaders which included trumpeter Maynard Ferguson. Oscar Peterson had permission to play the baby grand piano during the lunch hours and in his words this was “the best way to have a bunch of girls come down. I became the guy.” 

Peterson expanded his classical piano training and broadened his range while mastering the core classical pianism from rigorous scales to such staples of every pianist’s repertoire as preludes and fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach. He also worked on emulating Art Tatum’s pianism and aesthetics. Peterson also absorbed Tatum’s musical influences, notably from piano concertos by Sergei Rachmaninoff. Rachmaninoff’s harmonizations, as well as direct quotations from his second piano concerto, are thrown here and there in many recordings by Peterson, including his work with the Ray Brown and Herb Ellis Trio, such as “When Your Lover Has Gone”. Other artists who influenced Oscar during the early years were Teddy Williams, Nat (King) Cole, and James P. Johnson.

In 1944 Oscar married his year long girlfriend by the name of Lillie Fraser. In late 1947 Oscar led a trio at the Alberta Lounge in Montreal. Once a week a local radio station broadcast his show live from The Alberta. Norman Granz, the producer of Jazz at the Philharmonic, heard the broadcast on the Radio and was so impressed that he told the cab driver to take him to the studio. Oscar’s life would change dramatically. Norman Granz took Oscar to New York to play as a surprise guest at the Carnegie Hall performance of his Jazz at the Philharmonic. Oscar came up from the audience that night and played a duet with bassist Ray Brown which thrilled the audience and critics alike. Thus began Oscar’s lifelong relationship with Mr. Granz.

Soon after his appearance at Carnegie Hall Oscar was invited to join the Jazz at the Philharmonic. They toured North America. After a few years Oscar Peterson set up his own trio. Granz and Peterson developed a deep and lasting friendship. Is was much more than a managerial relationship; Peterson praised Granz for standing up for him and other black jazz musicians in the segregationist south of the 1950s and 1960s. For example, in the Canadian Broadcasting Company’s two-part documentary video Music in the Key of Oscar, Peterson tells how Granz stood up to a gun-toting southern policeman who wanted to stop the trio from using “white-only” taxis. Oscar Peterson and his trio worked incredibly hard and were considered one of the best jazz trios in the world. While playing at a club in Washington DC, Oscar Peterson met his idol Art Tatum. They became close friends and played for each other on many occasions. Oscar was joined by several people in his trio, each group having a distinct feel and flavor. Oscar especially enjoyed playing with Ed Thigpen on drums. He describes this time as “…six years of unbelievable music.” Eventually Oscar would regularly play with the greatest jazz artist of his era of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Parker, Barney Kessel, Herb Ellis, Joe Pass, Ray Brown, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, Clark Terry, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Milt Jackson, Stéphane Grappelli, Anita O’Day, Fred Astaire, Irving Ashby, Herbie Hancock, Bennie Green, Keith Emerson, Stan Getz, Louis Hyes, Bobby Durham, Ray Price, Sam Jones, George Mraz, Martin Drew, David Young, Alvin Queen and Ulf Wakenius. 

He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1972, and promoted to Companion, its highest rank, in 1984. He is also a member of the Order of Ontario, a Chevalier of the Ordre du Québec, and an officer of the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

His work has earned Oscar Peterson seven Grammy awards over the years and he was elected to the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1978. He also belongs to the Juno Awards Hall of Fame and the Canadian Jazz and Blues Hall of Fame. He has received the Roy Thomson Award (1987), a Toronto Arts Award for lifetime achievement (1991), the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award (1992), the Glenn Gould Prize (1993), the award of the International Society for Performing Artists (1995), the Loyola Medal of Concordia University (1997), the Praemium Imperiale World Art Award (1999), the UNESCO Music Prize (2000), and the Toronto Musicians’ Association Musician of the Year award (2001).

In 1993, Oscar suffered a serious stroke that weakened his left side and sidelined him for two years. However he has overcome this setback and started touring, recording and composing again. In 1997 he received a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement and an International Jazz Hall of Fame Award, proof that Oscar Peterson is still regarded as one of the greatest jazz musicians ever to play. 

Oscar Peterson passed away on December 23, 2007 with his dog “Smedley” named after his dear friend Norman Granz by his side. He had seven children by four wives. Soon after Peterson’s death, the University of Toronto Mississauga opened a major student residence in March 2008 as “Oscar Peterson Hall.” 

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Artist Highlight – Count Basie

Count Basie

“If you play a tune and a person don’t tap their feet, don’t play the tune. “
Count Basie 

by Ranie Smith

Count Basie was regarded as one of the most important bandleaders of the swing era. He lived from August 21, 1904 to April 26, 1984. Basie led his popular Count Basie Orchestra for almost fifty years. Both of Basie’s parents were musicians; his father, Harvie Basie, played the mellophone, and his mother, Lillian (Childs) Basie, was a pianist. She gave her son his earliest lessons. Basie also learned from Harlem stride pianists, particularly Fats Waller who taught him how to play organ. 

In early 1929, Basie played with different bands, eventually settling into one led by Bennie Moten. Basie worked as a soloist before leading a band initially called the Barons of Rhythm. A few of Moten’s former band members joined this nine-piece swing band, among them Walter Page (bass), Freddie Green (guitar), Jo Jones (drums), and Lester Young (tenor saxophone). Jimmy Rushing became the singer. The band gained a residency at the Reno Club in Kansas City and began broadcasting on the radio. An announcer dubbed the pianist “Count” Basie. Basie got his big break when one of his broadcasts was heard by journalist and record producer John Hammond. Hammond touted him to agents and record companies. As a result, the band left Kansas City in the fall of 1936 and took an engagement at the Grand Terrace in Chicago. The next date was in Buffalo, NY, then on to Roseland in New York City. 

January 1937, Count Basie’s Band made its recording debut on Decca Records. Meanwhile, the band’s recording of “One O’Clock Jump” got its first chart entry in September 1937. The tune became the band’s theme song and it was later inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. 

Basie’s music was characterized by his trademark “jumping” beat and the contrapuntal accents of his own piano. “Stop Beatin’ Round the Mulberry Bush,” with Rushing on vocals, became a Top Ten hit in the fall of 1938. Basie spent the first half of 1939 in Chicago, meanwhile switching from Decca to Columbia Records, then went to the West Coast in the fall. He spent the early ’40s touring extensively, but after the U.S. entry into World War II in December 1941 and the onset of the recording ban in August 1942, his travel was restricted. In 1942 Basie moved to Queens, New York, to be with Catherine Morgan, a famous dancer from Cleveland. They got married in 1943. In his autobiography, “Good Morning Blues,” Basie said he married the girl from Cleveland in 1943 in Seattle. Their honeymoon was a string of one-night band appearances. The Basie band was working in New York when Katy was about to have a baby. She returned to Cleveland and stayed with her parents. Katy and Bill “Count” Basie’s only child, Diane Basie, was born in Cleveland. He rushed to Cleveland to be with his wife and daughter. Later, when they rejoined Basie in New York, he said he had vivid memories of seeing Katy getting off the plane from Cleveland carrying their baby. He said, “It was a special thrill bringing my family home from the airport that day, Old Base, his wife and daughter.” 

In 1943 while on the West Coast, he started to appear in five films, all released within a matter of months in 1943: Hit Parade of 1943, Reveille with Beverly, Stage Door Canteen, Top Man, and Crazy House. He also scored a series of Top Ten hits on the pop and R&B charts, including “I Didn’t Know About You” (pop, winter 1945); “Red Bank Blues” (R&B, winter 1945); “Rusty Dusty Blues” (R&B, spring 1945); “Jimmy’s Blues” (pop and R&B, summer/fall 1945); and “Blue Skies” (pop, summer 1946). Switching to RCA Victor Records, he topped the charts in February 1947 with “Open the Door, Richard!,” followed by three more Top Ten pop hits in 1947: “Free Eats,” “One O’Clock Boogie,” and “I Ain’t Mad at You (You Ain’t Mad at Me).” 

Joining ASCAP in 1943, his chief musical collaborators included Mack David, Jerry Livingston, James Rushing, Andy Gibson, Eddie Durham, and Lester Young. His songs and instrumentals also include “Good Morning Blues”; “Every Tub”; “John’s Idea”; “Basie Boogie”; “Blue and Sentimental”; “Gone With the Wind”; “I Ain’t Mad at You”; “Futile Frustration”; “Good Bait”; “Don’t You Miss Your Baby?”; “Miss Thing” “Riff Interlude”; “Panassie Stomp: “Shorty George”; “Out the Window”; “Hollywood Jump: “Nobody Knows”; “Swinging at the Daisy Chain”; and “I Left My Baby”. The big bands’ decline in popularity in the late ’40s hit Basie as it did his peers, and he broke up his orchestra at the end of the decade, opting to lead smaller units for the next couple of years. 

In the 1950’s, the big band era seemed to be near its end. Basie remained faithful to his beloved Kansas City Jazz style and helped keep the big band sound alive with his distinctive style of piano playing. In 1952, Count Basie increased his band back to the full Big Band sound with his 16-piece orchestra responding to the increased opportunities for touring. For example, he went overseas for the first time to play in Scandinavia in 1954, and thereafter international touring played a large part in his schedule. An important addition to the band in late 1954 was vocalist Joe Williams. The orchestra was re-established commercially by the 1955 album Count Basie Swings – Joe Williams Sings (released on Clef Records), particularly by the single “Every Day (I Have the Blues),” which reached the Top Five of the R&B charts and was later inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. 

Another key recording of this period was an instrumental reading of “April in Paris” that made the pop Top 40 and the R&B Top Ten in early 1956; it also was enshrined in the Grammy Hall of Fame. These hits made what Albert Murray (co-author of Basie’s autobiography, Good Morning Blues) called the “new testament” edition of the Basie band a major success .By the mid-1950s, Basie’s band had become one of the pre-eminent backing big bands for some of the finest jazz vocalists of the time. Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Frank Sinatra also recorded with Basie. In 1957 Basie released the live album At Newport. At the first Grammy Awards ceremony, Basie won the 1958 awards for Best Performance by a Dance Band and Best Jazz Performance, Group, for his Roulette Records LP Basie. Breakfast Dance and Barbecue was nominated in the dance band category for 1959.

Basie was nominated for best jazz performance for “Basie at Birdland” in 1961 and “The Legend” in 1962. Iin 1962, Basie switched to Frank Sinatra’s Reprise Records. Sinatra-Basie reached the Top Five in early 1963. It was followed by “This Time by Basie!” Hits of the 50’s and 60’s, which reached the Top 20 and won the 1963 Grammy Award for Best Performance by an Orchestra for Dancing. Basie teamed with various vocalists for a series of chart albums including Ella Fitzgerald (Ella and Basie!, 1963); Sinatra again (the Top 20 album It Might as Well Be Swing, 1964); Sammy Davis, Jr. (Our Shining Hour, 1965); the Mills Brothers (The Board of Directors, 1968); and Jackie Wilson (Manufacturers of Soul, 1968), Broadway Basie’s … Way (1966). Later Basie returned a pure jazz format. His album Standing Ovation earned a 1969 Grammy nomination for Best Instrumental Jazz Performance by a Large Group or Soloist with Large Group (Eight or More). The band had first recorded for Norman Granz on Clef, then moved to Roulette, where it spent its peak years of the late ’50s and early ’60s. When Granz returned to recording activity in 1972 with Pablo Records, it would also mean a final renaissance for Basie, whom Granz recorded magnificently in trio, small band formats as well as with the band. A series of pairings with Oscar Peterson produced some unusually invigorating Basie piano. Basie died April 24, 1984, of cancer, but the band continues playing on today. Count Basie is quote to have said: “All I wanted was to be big, to be in show business and to travel… and that’s what I’ve been doing all my life.”

Watch Count Basie on U-Tube 

One O’Clock Jump 

Count Basie in the film “Hit Parade”, 1943 

Count Basie in Zuerich, 1959

Ella Fitzgerald and Count Basie, 1979 






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Artist Highlight – Frank Martin

“The joy and passion I get when I touch a piano from the instrument has never changed” Frank Martin

Frank Martin Producer/Arranger/Keyboardist
Frank Martin Producer/Arranger/Keyboardist

Frank Martin, a producer/arranger is a sought after piano and keyboards player who regularly performs with artists such as Sting, Stevie Wonder, Patti Austin, Narada Michael Walden, etc. Frank Martin made himself available for an interview for our UC Jazz Club Newsletter.

We asked him, what is the most wonderful thing about jazz for you? Frank Martin told us that it is a vehicle for communication with other people. It’s a way to connect, it is a higher-level-than words, powerful connection. I love the listening and the playing off of each other. Music is a great vehicle to communicate.

What originally inspired you to become a jazz musician? Frank told us that the evolution started out of the joy of making music. “I can remember when my piano first arrived in my home as gift to my sisters by my grandmother. I remember putting my hands on it and feeling a strong connection. It was so profound! I still feel this way today when I touch a piano. The joy and passion I get from the instrument has never changed. 

I started out as an improvising piano player. The joy I felt was in exploring the world of improvisation and that easily leads one to jazz. Jazz is all about improvisation. It was a natural progression into the jazz world.

I also had the good luck of finding pianist/organist Don Burke.
I grew up in Oakland and initially he was in Oakland and eventually he moved to San Leandro. He and Dave Brubeck studied with the same teacher. I often started my lessons with the music of Dave Brubeck. Don also had me play Miles Davis and Bill Evans. He would play this music and I started to learn and develop a love for that music. I have to give him the credit for planting the seeds.

My first public performance was at Disneyland when I was five years old. I was in Disneyland and by chance ran into another five year old friend of mine who was there as well. When they got the kids on stage, I jumped up with my friend Mike McGuire and felt very comfortable and admittedly enjoyed the attention. 

We sang Davey Crocket. This led to another singing talent show, the King Norman Show, when I was in third grade. The King Norman Show put on talent shows at various schools and the regional winners would be invited to Los Angeles to go up against other kids. It was somewhat similar to American Idol, although very loosly. The kids that won the King Norman Show contest locally got to go to Los Angeles and compete against the other local winners. At my school I was lucky enough to win with my singing 3rd grade partner Mark Rice. Just before going on the air the show pianist worked with all the kids, and that as well got the bug going for playing the piano.

Performing with a band, that didn’t start until high school. The first time we performed publicly was in San Leandro and the band played for a total of $15.00. The name of that first band was “The Trend”. I played the electric organ. 

My first organ was a VOX Continental Organ. It was a very cool thing to have. My second was a Farfisa and my third was a Fender Roads Electric Piano. We even wrote some of our own music. We mostly played the contemporary pop/rock songs of that time, which is what the kids in high school really wanted to hear. 

I remember enjoying composing, it was a fun thing to do. I was not that good of a music reader and felt more comfortable making up what I wanted to play. I found myself as the years went on organizing jam sessions and get togethers with other players. My parents opened our home for these events and I organized the music. I still organize the music today.

I suppose I got my start when we had those sessions at my parents home.

What’s next on the horizon? Well, on Thursday, May 8 at 7pm, I will perform with Sting at Carnegie Hall as part of the annual Save the Rainforest concert which Sting has produced for the last almost 15 years. Also performing will be my long time musical friend drummer/producer Narada Michael Walden.

For this upcoming performance at Carnegie Hall, my job is to transcribe what we will perform and have it ready for the rhythm section >> 3 keyboard players, two guitarists, a bassist, percussionist and drummer.

Legendary reedman Jim Horn is the one who does the horn parts and if there is a string section, either I do it, or I get help from the Trombone player, Tom Malone of the Letterman band. I have another friend that helps if need be, local conductor/arranger Barbara Christmann. Just prior to these shows some of the stars still are trying to decide what to do, so much of what I do is at the very last minute. For me, working with Sting’s Rainforest band has been 10 years of total joy!!

Recently I just finished producing a record for a local Bay Area singer, Karen Blixt. “Mad Hope” is her second record that I’ve produced for her, the first being “Spin This.”. We are going to play at Yoshi’s on the 15th of April in Oakland. The show will be open to the public. On trumpet will be Randy Brecker from the Brecker Brothers. We also will have the great pianist Patrice Rushen, which for me is a great honor to be able to perform with her. On rhythm guitar we have Jose Neto of the Steve Winwood band. Also the great percussionist/drummer Alex Acuna from the Weather Report band will be with us. He is a simply a wonderful percussionist. Also will be bassist Abraham Laboriel, who is the most recorded bass player in history and former “Yellowjackets” member William Kennedy as the drummer. Vocalist Kenny Washington will make a guest appearance as well. He did one song as a duet, “Five and Five”(aka “Take Ten”) For that record I co-composed 8 songs, and arranged and produced it. We recorded it at the Skywalker Studio in Marin County with the great engineer Leslie Ann Jones.

And I’m half way finished with my second production for Dutch singer Ellen Honert. The first one was “Breath of the Soul” and featured Tuck & Patti, the Turtle Island String Quartet, Brazilian vocalist/guitarist Dori Caymmi and many others.

My process of working with the musicians begins with making demos of the songs and sending it to them. That way they get a feel for what I’m looking for. We never rehearse so the more clarity I provide, the better. The process of recording the demos in my San Rafael studio is something I really love to do. It’s an expansion of what I did at my parents home. I organize the people and bring them together to play. 

What does an arranger do exactly? An arranger organizes what the musicians will play. Decides how best to utilize the available instruments and capitalize on the strengths of the players who will be recording. The producer gets the musicians to perform at their highest level and makes sure everything runs smoothly. In my opinion the key is to get the best musicians for the recording. Kind of like cooking … great ingredients allow for the best meal. One has to wear a lot of hats during productions. Needing to stay true to the artist and help realize their vision, as well as help guide them along their path. And to provide a comfortable arena for all of the performers to shine at their best.

I enjoy keeping busy. I teach at UC Jazz Ensembles, I have private students, I teach classes at the Jazzschool, and I participate in Summer Camps, i.e. Jazz Camp West and the Lafayette Summer Music Workshops. I find myself performing all the time as well …

Who are some of the favorite musicians that you have worked to work with and why? When asked who Frank Martin enjoys working with he mused. I enjoy working with Abraham Laboriel, Alex Acuna, William Kennedy he tells us. We have a strong connection with the four of us and the reason is that we all come from a place of joy. They all have perpetual smiles on their faces. Same for guitarist Jose Neto. They love so much what they do and they are masters. They are so joyful to be around. It makes for a wonderful experience.

Generally, those are my favorite people to perform with. Now there is Stevie Wonder, he is a true genius musically. Herbie Hancock – he is a joy and a great inspiration. And my ideal singer is Patti Austin. She is a consummate professional who expects you to be that as well. She is full of joy and life and I love how she communicates with people. I used to work a lot with vocalist Angela Bofill before she had her second stroke. She can get around a little bit now. She needs all our prayers. I go to visit her sometimes. She has a great attitude. After her first stroke she couldn’t speak and with time she went back to speaking at about 85%. She is paralyzed on her left side and is fighting hard. She remains truly inspiring she was a great joy to work with.

What in your opinion makes a great performer? I think one that communicates sincerely. Not only verbally but in what they are playing and singing. Those that park their egos at the door … Many of my favorite musicians have a Jazz background, and many are based in Rhythm and Blues. I love performers that make rhythm of the utmost importance. There are many who just play the song. The great performers always share of themselves and bring something personal to the song.

Are there any suggestions you have for the young musicians in the UC Jazz Ensembles and other inspiring musicians? Yes, be true to yourself and follow your passion. Try to keep that in mind! You are going to hear from a lot of people that you should do something else. That it’s too hard to make it in the arts.That is typically well-intentioned advice, but you can’t take somebodies dream away. You have to have the belief. Follow your passion – attitude is everything!

I tell my students this example. There are a couple of bass players. One says that “there is no work, what am I gonna do?” The other one says “I am so busy!! I got my fifth gig today and I have five more tomorrow.” I tell my students that they are both right. There is no work and in the same town they is too much work. It is not easy, but it is all about the work you put into it. Have a healthy attitude and follow the passion and don’t give up.

How can a novice listener become more knowledgeable about jazz? It is about exposure. Exposure is always the thing. It is like a fine wine if you don’t have the opportunity and if you don’t try it you can’t find out what resonates with you. Exposure to it makes you appreciate it more. Like a good painting, only if you see the painting can you appreciate it. You have to watch and listen. It is a process. My recommendation is that you go to jazz concerts and find out what resonates with you. One artist may resonate with you and may not resonate with another. Maybe just allowing yourself the time to go to Yoshi’s or Anna’s Island and experiencing live music will bring you closer to the music. If you can’t do that use the Internet. The Internet is filled with music of one artist after another. Every style of performer is there! Go to Youtube.com and type in a jazz artists name and you will find him or her performing someplace. It is the same for internet sites like Rhapsody.com and DailyMotion.com. Listen to the music of a jazz artist. Exposure! There is no magical way to appreciate something one doesn’t know.

What is coming up next for you? I am going to be in Bend, Oregon. A local promoter and jazz fan decided to bring together Brazilian guitarist Jose Neto and the great New York based jazz sax player Eric Anderson for a night of Brazilian jazz, along with Brazilian drummer Celso Alberti and myself. Then I am doing some concert work with an Irish Jazz singer Melanie O’Rielly at the Freight & Salvage in Berkeley. Then we are off to LA to perform at the Raven, a club for actors. She has an acting background and we will do a duo. Her style is Irish Jazz ~ traditional music that meets kind of McCoy Tyner!. Then I am starting a recording project with her, writing music inspired by the writings of James Joyce. That should be interesting. And the night after the Raven will perform in a jazz quartet with New York drummer Paul Peress and players I’ve yet to meet, at Spaghetini’s, a Jazz Club in LA. Then comes performance at Carnegie Hall with Sting. I am blessed to be busy doing what I love ~ music music music!! Who knew that those jam sessions at my parents home would spark a career in music …

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Noah Griffin stars in “Nat Tonight Dear!”

Noah Griffin Invites UC Jazz Club fans to join him in a celebration of Nat King Cole

“They see the possibility of a black president as natural as Tiger Woods winning the Masters”
Noah Griffin (talking about his children) 

Noah Griffin, a highly-regarded Bay Area singer, has been enchanting audiences since the age of 7 when he performed with the San Francisco Boy’s Chorus.  His talent was appreciated by such greats as Paul Robeson, Leantyde Price, Johnny Ray and Nat King Cole with whom he shared the stage. He performed with the Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Philharmonic, Fisk University Choir and the famed Jubilee Singers, they performed Porgy and Bess with the Nashville Symphony where Noah had a solo. 

As a soloist Noah Griffin performed with Duke Ellington, Shirelles, Kings and he performed in Carmen, Boris Gudenov, Turandot and soloing in La Boheme with the San Francisco Cosmopolitan Opera Company. Noah Griffin was chosen to solo with Duke Ellington in his Boston debut of his “Sacred Concert”. 

After graduating from Harvard Law School in Boston, Noah Griffin returned to the San Francisco Bay Area where he has lived ever since. While raising his children Noah Griffin had an illustrious career as a syndicated newspaper columnist, radio talk show host, singer and songwriter. 

Noah Griffin regularly performs in San Francisco, New York, Boston, London, Rome and Paris.  Noah Griffin’ Tribute to Cole Porter took the world by storm and he regularly sells out at such classical venues like Birdland in NY. Now Noah Griffin brings Nat King Cole alive with his popular tribute.

Nat Tonight Dear! 

A Tribute to NAT KING COLE performance by Noah Griffin will arrive in San Francisco on Friday April 11, 2008 8PM at the University Club, 800 Powell Street, San Francisco, CA 94108 

Noah Griffin pays tribute to Nat King Cole, an unforgettable talent. Come together with your loved ones, friends or on your own to honor the wonderful love songs of the King. April 11, 2008 8PM. 


Nat King Cole 

Nat King Cole was one of the earliest and most famous black cross-over artists who gained a huge national and international following with such popular songs as “Mona Lisa,” “When I Fall In Love”, “Unforgettable”, “Too Young” “Straighten Up and Fly Right”, and “Pretend”.  Nat King Cole broke through major racial barriers in the entertainment industry as the first black American to have his own national radio show and the first black American to have his own television show. In 1946, Nat started doing a radio show every week. He would play for half an hour on Saturday afternoon, from whatever town he was doing concerts in. The radio show lasted for 4 years. Nat also appeared in quite a few movies. The best known of these is St Louis Blues in which he played the role of the jazz composer W.C. Handy. He was one of the first people to make records with Capitol Records. He eventually appeared in a film about himself called The Nat King Cole Story. He appeared in the Ed Sullivan Show and performed in Las Vegas. He sold over 50 million records. He passed away at a very young age in 1965.

San Francisco audiences are privileged to be the first to enjoy Noah Griffin’s next classic performance of his “Tribute Series”.  He will premiere his new “Nat Tonight Dear!  Tribute to Nat King Cole” on April 11, 2008 at 8pm at  the University Club, 800 Powell Street, San Francisco, CA 94108 For Directions Call: 415.781.0900.
                                       
Eddie Fisher has called Noah Griffin a “great singer” and George Shearing “loves his work”.   Reserve your seats and buy your tickets now!   Buy tickets by calling 415.384-0256 now.  Admission is $40.00 per person. 

Learn more about Noah Griffin by visiting the following links.

www.noahgriffin.com

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Karen Blixt and Frank Martin’s second record will be performed at Yoshi’s April 15th, 2008

Karen Blixt -Mad Hope
Frank Martin on piano with Karen Blixt

Karen Blixt and her “Mad Hope” ~ Frank’s second record he produced for Karen Blixt. Yoshi’s on the 15th April in Oakland. The show will be open to the public. On trumpet will be Randy Brecker from the Brecker Brothers. Frank Martin on piano and keyboard. We also will have well known pianist Patrice Rushen. On guitar will be Jose Neto of the Steve Winwood band. On percussion will be Alex Acuna from the Weather Report band. Bassist Abraham Laboriel, who is the most recorded bass player in history and former Yellowjacket member William Kennedy as the drummer will round out the rhythm section. Vocalist Kenny Washington will make a guest appearance as well. On the CD he recorded one song as a duet with Karen.


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